Mazda CX-30 the latest Mazda to feature 2.5-litre turbo

Mazda's following the old muscle car philosophy of putting a big car's engine in a small car, with the CX-30 scoring the big daddy CX-9's turbo four – but it hasn't been confirmed for Australia.

Comments
Previous News
2023 Ford F-150 EV will be faster than a Raptor
2023 Ford F-150 EV will be faster than a Raptor
William Stopford
William Stopford
Journalist
Published

The Mazda CX-30 could offer the most powerful engine in its segment – if Mazda Australia can get its hands on it.

The new flagship turbocharged 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine has been introduced by the company’s Mexican operations, where it’ll be built. It’ll go on sale in North American markets later this year.

A spokesperson from Mazda Australia confirmed the CX-30 Turbo is “left-hand drive only at this stage”.

“It’s something that we’re interested in, and we’ll continue to talk about. Until it’s made in right-hand drive form we can’t commit to it,” they said.

It’s the same story as with the Mazda 3 Turbo, built in the same factory and using the same powertrain, which has also been ruled out for now.

The Skyactiv-G 2.5 Turbo engine delivers 186kW of power and 433Nm of torque when running on premium unleaded fuel, or 169kW and 420Nm with regular unleaded fuel.

It’s available only with all-wheel drive and a six-speed automatic transmission, just like in the new Mazda 3 Turbo that remains off-limits to us.

The same powertrain is used in the CX-5 and CX-9 and – sans all-wheel drive – in the Mazda 6, too.

The US-market CX-30 Turbo appears to correspond with our flagship Astina, with a standard Bose 12-speaker sound system, surround-view camera and adaptive LED headlights.

It’s distinguished from its naturally-aspirated counterpart through the use of 18-inch black alloy wheels, larger exhaust outlets, gloss black exterior mirrors and a subtle turbo badge on the tailgate.

In contrast, Mazda makes the 2.5-litre turbo an option on its top two CX-5 grades in Australia instead of offering it as a standalone model.

If a right-hand drive CX-30 Turbo is introduced Down Under, it’ll offer more power than anything in the small SUV segment.

Distant runners-up include the Volkswagen T-Roc 140TSI (140kW/320Nm) and the Hyundai Kona and Kia Seltos 1.6T (130kW/265Nm).

The CX-30 Turbo features the same outputs as the CX-9, which weighs just over 2000kg in top-spec trim with all-wheel drive. The CX-30, in contrast, weighs just 1544kg in G25 Astina all-wheel drive trim.

Share
Link copied!
William Stopford
William Stopford
William Stopford is a Journalist at CarExpert.
Learn about CarExpert or contact CarExpert.
Next News
2021 Audi RS3 Sedan spied at the Nurburgring
2021 Audi RS3 Sedan spied at the Nurburgring

Also on CarExpert

review
2022 Tesla Model Y review: First drive
2022 Tesla Model Y review: First drive