Ferrari reshuffle puts focus on electrified future

Ferrari appears to be looking at an electrified future and has done an organisation restructure ahead of its 2030 carbon neutral pledge.

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Ferrari has announced its new organisational structure that points towards its electrified future.

The Italian automaker already has the SF90 plug-in hybrid (PHEV) supercar and its yet-to-be revealed SUV known as the Purosangue with potential hybridisation, as well as two electric SUVs to reportedly follow.

Also in April 2021, then interim Ferrari CEO John Elkann confirmed Ferrari is definitely going to make an all-electric car, and it will be unveiled in 2025.

This organisational reshuffle is said to “nurture the exclusivity of the brad, enrich product excellence, stay true to its racing DNA and focus on the achievement of carbon neutrality by 2030.”

Ferrari has broadened its leadership team with the promotion of internal talent and has bolstered this with a number of external hires from technology backgrounds.

In particular, there are two new hires, Ernesto Lasalandra and Angelo Pesci, from French semiconductor manufacturing company STMicroelectronics.

This company produces a range of products for infotainment, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), vehicle-to-everything (V2X), 48V mild-hybrid systems and battery management systems (BMS), among others.

It’s uncertain if the Ferrari, with these new external hires’ prior knowledge, will begin exploring hybrid technology based on supercapacitors like Lamborghini did for its limited-production Sian.

“We want to push the boundaries further in all areas by harnessing technology in a unique Ferrari way,” said current Ferrari CEO Benedetto Vigna.

As part of this organisation restructure, Gianmaria Fulgenzi has been appointed chief product development officer.

Mr Fulgenzi has been working for Ferrari since 2002 and has held various senior roles in product development, manufacturing and more recently at its racing division, Scuderia Ferrari, as head of supply chain.

As mentioned before, Mr Lasalandra has previously worked for STMicroelectronics as group vice president and research and development (R&D) general manager where he gained over 20 years of experience within a high-tech environment.

Mr Lasalandra has been brought to Ferrari as chief R&D officer.

Rounding out the product development and R&D reshuffle, Philippe Krief will become Mr Lasalandra’s deputy.

Mr Krief is already working for Ferrari and has over 35 years of experience in the automotive sector.

With the promotion of Silvia Gabriella as chief digital and data officer, Ferrari says it is hoping to accelerate a digital transformation process throughout the company.

Ms Gabriella has been working with Ferrari since 2019 and has previously worked for Microsoft and other global players in the digital domain.

Ex-Ferrari head of technologies, Davide Abate, has now been appointed as chief technologies and infrastructures officer for the Prancing Horse.

With Mr Abate’s position shuffle, Ferrari is aiming to strengthen the collaboration and alignment between development and manufacturing of its cars.

Also as mentioned above, Mr Pesci previously worked for STMicroelectronics in areas of financial planning, supply chain and product planning, as well as services and operations.

Mr Pesci has been hired as Ferrari’s chief purchasing and quality officer.

Andrea Antichi has been appointed as chief manufacturing officer and was previously head of vehicle. Mr Antichi has worked for Ferrari since 2006.

All of these people now directly report to the Ferrari CEO, Mr Vigna.

Although the company has conducted all of these position reshuffles, the following functions still report into the CEO:

  • Brand diversification: Mr Vigna ad interim
  • Content & communication: Charlie Tuner
  • Design: Flavio Manzoni
  • Finance & Financial Service: Antonio Picca Piccon
  • Gestione Sportive (Scuderia Ferrari): Mattia Binotto
  • Human Resources: Michele Antoniazzi
  • Legal: Carlo Daneo
  • Marketing & Commercial: Enrico Galliera

For now, we’ll have to wait and see what Ferrari has in store for the next few years as it heads towards a carbon neutral and high-tech future.

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Jack Quick

Jack Quick is an emerging automotive journalist based in Melbourne, Australia. Jack recently graduated from Deakin University and has previously competed in dance nationally. In his spare time, Jack likes to listen to hyperpop and play Forza Horizon.

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