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2022 Maserati GranTurismo spied with less camouflage

The next Maserati GranTurismo has a similar silhouette to the old car, but with MC20-like details. It'll also offer an electric powertrain.

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Jack Quick
Jack Quick
Journalist
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Maserati will soon reveal its new coupe and convertible grand tourer, which will also offer an electric powertrain.

This particular GranTurismo prototype has dropped some of the camouflage previously seen when it was officially teased by the Italian automaker over six months ago.

After ending production in late 2019, the new GranTurismo had been expected to debut in 2021. For now, it’s expected to be revealed in the first half of 2022.

Maserati has previously confirmed the new GranTurismo will offer an electric Folgore variant – Italian for ‘lightning’ – making it the brand’s first electric vehicle.

Under the bonnet of this GranTurismo prototype is reportedly a version of the 3.0-litre twin-turbocharged ‘Nettuno’ V6 engine from the MC20.

In the MC20, it produces 463kW of power and 730Nm of torque.

Autoblog reported in 2020 that Maserati’s new 800V Folgore electric vehicle (EV) powertrain would feature one electric motor on the front axle and two over the rear.

The MC20 will also gain an all-electric variant.

Although details about the GranTurismo’s electric drivetrain have yet-to-be revealed, Maserati claims the MC20 EV will have a 0-100km/h time of 2.8 seconds, a top speed of 310km/h, and a driving range of 323km using the WLTP standard.

That’s 0.1 seconds quicker than the petrol MC20, though its top speed is down 15km/h.

Although the electric powertrain might be a significant change for Maserati, the styling of the GranTurismo isn’t.

The prototype features the same, classic grand tourer silhouette as the old GranTurismo, with a long bonnet and a short rear overhang.

From the front, this particular prototype has less camouflage on its oval-shaped grille, as well as two triangular side air intakes.

There’s no longer any camouflage on the vertically-oriented headlights, which bear a closer resemblance to those of the MC20 sportscar than the old GranTurismo.

Around the side, this GranTurismo prototype has black alloy wheels behind which sit bright red brake calipers and cross-drilled rotors.

The door handles also look very similar to the push-button, indented ones on the MC20.

At the back there are slimmer tail lights that once again have a design very similar to the MC20. There are also quad exhaust outlets.

Maserati has previously confirmed the GranTurismo will continue to be offered with a drop-top GranCabrio variant.

Though Maserati has thus far only introduced mild-hybrid models like the Ghibli Hybrid and Levante Hybrid, it has promised to electrify its entire range by 2025.

Speaking at a fashion event in December 2020, Maserati CEO Davide Grasso said “the entire Maserati line and the new models will also be available full electric, including the Grecale SUV that will be released next year and the following GranTurismo and GranCabrio.”

Also set to receive an all-electric variant is the next-generation Quattroporte, due in 2023.

Although the GranTurismo will breathe some new life into the Maserati line, the all-electric Grecale Folgore will be a higher-volume model for the brand.

Like the internal combustion engine-powered Grecale, it’ll share its Giorgio platform with the Alfa Romeo Stelvio.

The regular Grecale will use Maserati engines instead of sharing with the Stelvio.

The new GranTurismo will replace the now-defunct model revealed at the 2007 Geneva motor show.

Its drop-top sibling, the GranCabrio, debuted at the 2009 Frankfurt motor show.

A total of 28,805 GranTurismos and 11,715 GranCabrios were produced, all powered by naturally-aspirated 4.2- and 4.7-litre V8 engines jointly developed by Ferrari and Maserati.

MORE: Everything Maserati GranTurismo

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Jack Quick
Jack Quick

Jack Quick is an emerging automotive journalist based in Melbourne, Australia. Jack recently graduated from Deakin University and has previously competed in dance nationally. In his spare time, Jack likes to listen to hyperpop and play Forza Horizon.

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