2022 Maserati GranTurismo teased

The next-generation Maserati GranTurismo will still offer petrol power but will also feature the brand's first all-electric powertrain.

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William Stopford
William Stopford
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Maserati won’t be without a grand tourer for much longer.

The company has teased a replacement for its GranTurismo, which ended production in late 2019.

The new GranTurismo will also offer an all-electric Folgore variant – Italian for ‘lightning’ – making it the brand’s first all-electric vehicle.

Maserati didn’t provide any more information on the GranTurismo, though we expect it to debut this year with the Folgore variant appearing in 2022.

The company has previously confirmed it’ll continue to be offered with a drop-top GranCabrio variant.

While an EV is a radical departure for Maserati, the styling of the new car isn’t.

It’s blessed with the same, classic grand tourer proportions as the old car, with a long bonnet and a short rear deck.

Up front there’s Maserati’s trademark deeply inset grille with the trident badge, though the headlights appear to have a vertical orientation this time and follow the curve of the front fenders.

The headlights bear a closer resemblance to those of the mid-engined MC20 than the old GranTurismo.

Autoblog reported in 2020 that Maserati’s new 800V Folgore powertrain would feature one electric motor on the front axle and two over the rear.

The petrol-powered GranTurismo will reportedly use a version of the 3.0-litre twin-turbocharged ‘Nettuno’ V6 from the MC20 supercar, Maserati’s first in-house developed and manufactured engine in 20 years.

In the MC20, it produces 463kW of power at 7500rpm, and 730Nm of torque between 3000 and 5500rpm.

The MC20 will also gain an all-electric variant.

Although details about its electric drivetrain have yet to revealed, Maserati claims the MC20 EV will have a 0-100km/h time of 2.8 seconds, a top speed of 310km/h, and a driving range of 323km using the WLTP standard.

That’s 0.1 seconds quicker than the petrol MC20, though its top speed is down 15km/h.

The new GranTurismo will lead the charge – pun intended – for Maserati’s electrification efforts.

The company has thus far only introduced mild-hybrid models like the Ghibli Hybrid and Levante Hybrid, but it has promised to electrify its entire range by 2025.

Speaking at a fashion event in December 2020, Maserati CEO Davide Grasso said “the entire Maserati line and the new models will also be available full electric, including the Grecale SUV that will be released next year and the following GranTurismo and GranCabrio”.

Existing models will be available with hybrid power.

One model that’s expected to receive an all-electric variant is the next-generation Quattroporte, due in 2023.

While the GranTurismo will breathe rarified air as the flagship of the Maserati line, the all-electric Grecale Folgore will be a higher-volume model for the brand.

Like the internal combustion engine-powered Grecale, it’ll share its Giorgio platform with the Alfa Romeo Stelvio.

The last five-year plan under the former Fiat Chrysler Automobiles nixed an electrified version of the Stelvio, though plans may have changed following FCA’s merger with Groupe PSA to become Stellantis.

The ‘regular’ Grecale will use Maserati engines instead of sharing with the Stelvio.

The new GranTurismo will replace the now-defunct model revealed at the 2007 Geneva motor show.

Its drop-top sibling, the GranCabrio, debuted at the 2009 Frankfurt motor show.

A total of 28,805 GranTurismos and 11,715 units of the convertible were produced, all powered by naturally-aspirated 4.2- and 4.7-litre V8 engines jointly developed by Ferrari and Maserati.

Maserati ended production of the coupe and its GranCabrio drop-top sibling in late 2019, sending the line off with the stunning, one-off Zéda with wild, tri-colour paintwork.

MORE: Maserati GranTurismo news and reviews
MORE: Maserati GranCabrio news and reviews

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William Stopford
William Stopford
William Stopford is a Journalist at CarExpert.
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