Best medium SUVs

    Australia’s Best medium SUVs as ranked by CarExpert

    People choose medium SUVs because these models tend to offer a lot of space, thoughtfulness and practicality for the money.

    In fact, in Australia, medium SUVs are typically the second-most popular vehicle type, but they do fall well behind utes in the sales race.

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    Toyota RAV4
    8.6
    Toyota RAV4
    $39,760 - $58,360

    Pros: Class-leading fuel economy, balanced dynamics, spacious cabin

    Cons: Supply issues, prices have gone way up, a touch dated inside

    Boot space: 580L

    The RAV4 has been Australia’s best-selling medium SUV at times, but supply issues have been a serious detractor from this model’s potential success in the market. In fact, it has seen some customers turn their back and buy something else, because waits for hybrid high-grade models in particular have stretched beyond 12 months in some instances.

    There’s a perfectly fine entry-level 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine with a CVT auto and front-wheel drive across most variants in the model range, but the petrol-electric hybrid versions – which attract a $3000 price premium for 2WD and a circa-$6000 increase if you want AWD – are what most buyers are drawn to.

    The hybrid models are super efficient on paper, with claimed consumption pegged at 4.7 litres per 100km for the 160kW 2WD and 4.8L/100km for the 163kW AWD model. That said, the entry-level 127kW 2.0L uses just 6.0L/100km on the combined cycle, while the range-topping 2.5L petrol (152kW) Edge variant has a claim of 7.0L/100km.

    While there are some rivals that offer plug-in hybrid tech with even more mind-blowing efficiency, the RAV4 also stands out for its driving manners, with a competitive ride/handling balance, a spacious interior, and a long list of standard safety equipment. It’s a very impressive all-rounder.

    The RAV4 is backed by a five-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty, and there’s a five-year capped-price servicing plan with maintenance due every 12 months/15,000km. Also nice to note is the potential for a seven-year warranty for the powertrain if you service the vehicle on time, and hybrid models may see a 10-year warranty for their battery components, provided an annual health check is done by Toyota.

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    5 Door Wagon
    55 L > 786 to 1146 km
    AWD/FWD
    480 - 1500 kg Towing Capacity

    Efficient hybrid powertrain

    So-so infotainment

    Pros: Class-leading fuel economy, balanced dynamics, spacious cabin

    Cons: Supply issues, prices have gone way up, a touch dated inside

    Boot space: 580L

    The RAV4 has been Australia’s best-selling medium SUV at times, but supply issues have been a serious detractor from this model’s potential success in the market. In fact, it has seen some customers turn their back and buy something else, because waits for hybrid high-grade models in particular have stretched beyond 12 months in some instances.

    There’s a perfectly fine entry-level 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine with a CVT auto and front-wheel drive across most variants in the model range, but the petrol-electric hybrid versions – which attract a $3000 price premium for 2WD and a circa-$6000 increase if you want AWD – are what most buyers are drawn to.

    The hybrid models are super efficient on paper, with claimed consumption pegged at 4.7 litres per 100km for the 160kW 2WD and 4.8L/100km for the 163kW AWD model. That said, the entry-level 127kW 2.0L uses just 6.0L/100km on the combined cycle, while the range-topping 2.5L petrol (152kW) Edge variant has a claim of 7.0L/100km.

    While there are some rivals that offer plug-in hybrid tech with even more mind-blowing efficiency, the RAV4 also stands out for its driving manners, with a competitive ride/handling balance, a spacious interior, and a long list of standard safety equipment. It’s a very impressive all-rounder.

    The RAV4 is backed by a five-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty, and there’s a five-year capped-price servicing plan with maintenance due every 12 months/15,000km. Also nice to note is the potential for a seven-year warranty for the powertrain if you service the vehicle on time, and hybrid models may see a 10-year warranty for their battery components, provided an annual health check is done by Toyota.

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    Tesla Model Y
    8.7
    Tesla Model Y
    $55,900 - $96,700

    Pros: Competitive value for money, big interior space, EV refinement

    Cons: A bit ubiquitous nowadays, short warranty, no spare

    Boot space: 854L, plus 117L frunk

    The Tesla Model Y has shot up the sales charts in Australia, with the electric midsize SUV offering a fully electric alternative for a small (for some) premium over a high-grade petrol or diesel midsize SUV.

    While not everyone finds the appearance of it to be attractive, you can’t argue with the value on offer, and the practicality this midsize model possesses, with its low-slung battery pack and unobtrusive electric motor layout meaning it is a lot more adept at dealing with luggage and loose items than any other vehicle on this list.

    There’s a roomy five-seat cabin, and a huge 854L boot space (including a section below the floor, where a spare wheel might otherwise be), and under the bonnet there’s an additional 117L of ‘frunk’ space, which is ideal to store your charging cables and the like.

    Being electric, the metrics are a bit different when it comes to usability and efficiency. So, the entry-level Model Y RWD single motor version ($69,300 MSRP) has a claimed 455km of driving range (WLTP) but can do 0-100km/h in 6.9 sec. The mid-spec Long Range AWD dual motor version ($82,300) has 533km WLTP rated range, and can sprint from 0-100km/h in 5.0sec. And the flagship Performance AWD dual motor has 514km WLTP range and a claimed 0-100km/h time of 3.7sec (with ‘rollout subtracted’).

    Be aware that the warranty cover for Tesla is less than the industry average, at four-year/80,000km for the vehicle, but the battery and drive unit is covered for eight years.

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    5 Door Wagon
    AWD/RWD
    1600 kg Towing Capacity

    Pros: Competitive value for money, big interior space, EV refinement

    Cons: A bit ubiquitous nowadays, short warranty, no spare

    Boot space: 854L, plus 117L frunk

    The Tesla Model Y has shot up the sales charts in Australia, with the electric midsize SUV offering a fully electric alternative for a small (for some) premium over a high-grade petrol or diesel midsize SUV.

    While not everyone finds the appearance of it to be attractive, you can’t argue with the value on offer, and the practicality this midsize model possesses, with its low-slung battery pack and unobtrusive electric motor layout meaning it is a lot more adept at dealing with luggage and loose items than any other vehicle on this list.

    There’s a roomy five-seat cabin, and a huge 854L boot space (including a section below the floor, where a spare wheel might otherwise be), and under the bonnet there’s an additional 117L of ‘frunk’ space, which is ideal to store your charging cables and the like.

    Being electric, the metrics are a bit different when it comes to usability and efficiency. So, the entry-level Model Y RWD single motor version ($69,300 MSRP) has a claimed 455km of driving range (WLTP) but can do 0-100km/h in 6.9 sec. The mid-spec Long Range AWD dual motor version ($82,300) has 533km WLTP rated range, and can sprint from 0-100km/h in 5.0sec. And the flagship Performance AWD dual motor has 514km WLTP range and a claimed 0-100km/h time of 3.7sec (with ‘rollout subtracted’).

    Be aware that the warranty cover for Tesla is less than the industry average, at four-year/80,000km for the vehicle, but the battery and drive unit is covered for eight years.

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     Hyundai Tucson
    8.3
    Hyundai Tucson
    $34,900 - $55,150

    Pros: Quiet and roomy cabin, long list of safety equipment, optional N Line pack for sporty looks

    Cons: Wheezy base engine, some models lack LED headlights, no hybrid yet

    Boot space: 539L

    According to public opinion, the Hyundai Tucson’s design is polarising. Some people love the sharp lines and edgy looks, but others are anti. One of the most criticised elements from an equipment perspective is the lack of LED headlights on some grades, despite attractive LED daytime running lights being a prominent feature of the front-end styling.

    What’s also interesting about the Tucson take on things is the highly popular N Line package, which is available on all grades and adds a number of stylish upgrades such as sports seats with leather and suede upholstery and a unique steering wheel and 19-inch alloy wheels. And yep, you get LED lights if you choose the pack, too. Depending on the spec you choose, the price varies (from $4000 on the base Tucson, through to $1500 on the top-spec model).

    The redesigned model launched in 2021 on a new platform, with the Australian market getting the version with the long-wheelbase and bigger body – other markets get a much smaller Tucson.

    But that’s good news for us, because it’s the most practical Tucson ever, with a very accommodating second-row seat, and a bigger-than-average boot capacity of 539L.

    The most affordable front-wheel drive models use a naturally-aspirated 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine with 115kW and 192Nm, which is on the lazy side. If you need all-wheel drive, you have the choice of a turbocharged 1.6-litre petrol (132kW/265Nm) or a 2.0-litre turbo-diesel (137kW/416Nm).

    The Tucson is backed by a five-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty, and Hyundai offers a lifetime capped-price servicing plan.

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    4 Door Wagon
    54 L > 667 to 857 km
    FWD/AWD
    1650 - 1900 kg Towing Capacity

    Available, torquey turbo-diesel

    Disappointing base engine

    Pros: Quiet and roomy cabin, long list of safety equipment, optional N Line pack for sporty looks

    Cons: Wheezy base engine, some models lack LED headlights, no hybrid yet

    Boot space: 539L

    According to public opinion, the Hyundai Tucson’s design is polarising. Some people love the sharp lines and edgy looks, but others are anti. One of the most criticised elements from an equipment perspective is the lack of LED headlights on some grades, despite attractive LED daytime running lights being a prominent feature of the front-end styling.

    What’s also interesting about the Tucson take on things is the highly popular N Line package, which is available on all grades and adds a number of stylish upgrades such as sports seats with leather and suede upholstery and a unique steering wheel and 19-inch alloy wheels. And yep, you get LED lights if you choose the pack, too. Depending on the spec you choose, the price varies (from $4000 on the base Tucson, through to $1500 on the top-spec model).

    The redesigned model launched in 2021 on a new platform, with the Australian market getting the version with the long-wheelbase and bigger body – other markets get a much smaller Tucson.

    But that’s good news for us, because it’s the most practical Tucson ever, with a very accommodating second-row seat, and a bigger-than-average boot capacity of 539L.

    The most affordable front-wheel drive models use a naturally-aspirated 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine with 115kW and 192Nm, which is on the lazy side. If you need all-wheel drive, you have the choice of a turbocharged 1.6-litre petrol (132kW/265Nm) or a 2.0-litre turbo-diesel (137kW/416Nm).

    The Tucson is backed by a five-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty, and Hyundai offers a lifetime capped-price servicing plan.

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    Kia Sportage
    8.2
    Kia Sportage
    $32,995 - $55,420

    Pros: Sleek appearance, multiple powertrain choices, long list of safety equipment

    Cons: Dud base engine, turbo with dual-clutch could be smoother, no hybrid yet

    Boot space: 543L

    The Kia Sportage is the cousin to the Hyundai Tucson, and as a result it shares its platform and engine line-up, as well as a few different features and technologies.

    You’ve got the choice of a 2.0-litre base engine with 115kW/192Nm – but in the Kia it is available with a six-speed manual transmission or six-speed auto, but you can only get the stick-shift version in the basic S or SX trim.

    As with Tucson, your engine options from there extend to a 132kW/265Nm 1.6-litre turbo-petrol with a DCT auto and all-wheel drive, or a 137kW/416Nm 2.0-litre turbo-diesel with an eight-speed auto and AWD. The latter is widely considered the best of the bunch, but just like the Hyundai, a hybrid version of this car is due in 2024.

    Really, when it comes to picking between the two, it’ll come down to a few things. The exterior styling will be one of them, as well as the design of the interior, which is vastly different, too, despite both offering exceptional levels of space for occupants and good boot space as well.

    Kia has its corporate cousin beat on warranty, with a seven-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty cover, and there’s seven years of capped-price servicing and roadside assistance as well. Just be mindful that Kia servicing costs can be a little high compared to rivals.

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    4 Door Wagon
    54 L > 667 to 1102 km
    AWD/FWD
    1650 - 1900 kg Towing Capacity

    Well-sorted locally-tuned ride

    Underdone base engine

    Pros: Sleek appearance, multiple powertrain choices, long list of safety equipment

    Cons: Dud base engine, turbo with dual-clutch could be smoother, no hybrid yet

    Boot space: 543L

    The Kia Sportage is the cousin to the Hyundai Tucson, and as a result it shares its platform and engine line-up, as well as a few different features and technologies.

    You’ve got the choice of a 2.0-litre base engine with 115kW/192Nm – but in the Kia it is available with a six-speed manual transmission or six-speed auto, but you can only get the stick-shift version in the basic S or SX trim.

    As with Tucson, your engine options from there extend to a 132kW/265Nm 1.6-litre turbo-petrol with a DCT auto and all-wheel drive, or a 137kW/416Nm 2.0-litre turbo-diesel with an eight-speed auto and AWD. The latter is widely considered the best of the bunch, but just like the Hyundai, a hybrid version of this car is due in 2024.

    Really, when it comes to picking between the two, it’ll come down to a few things. The exterior styling will be one of them, as well as the design of the interior, which is vastly different, too, despite both offering exceptional levels of space for occupants and good boot space as well.

    Kia has its corporate cousin beat on warranty, with a seven-year/unlimited-kilometre warranty cover, and there’s seven years of capped-price servicing and roadside assistance as well. Just be mindful that Kia servicing costs can be a little high compared to rivals.

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    Nissan X-Trail
    8.2
    Nissan X-Trail
    $37,250 - $58,490

    Pros: New design and refinement, great tech and safety, three-row options available

    Cons: More expensive than most rivals, servicing intervals are short and pricey

    Boot space: 465L with the third-row down for seven-seat models, up to 585L for five-seat versions

    The Nissan X-Trail arrived late to the party, but it was fashionably late. Having launched in other markets years before we got it, the new-generation model still offers a great choice for buyers in the market for a medium SUV with five or seven seats, and it also has an interesting array of powertrain options.

    The entry-level models are powered by a 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine with 135kW/234Nm, and it’s available with front- or all-wheel drive, depending on the grade. It uses a CVT automatic transmission, and fuel use is rated at 7.4L to 7.8L/100km.

    However, there’s also the odd-bod e-Power model, which employs a 1.5-litre three-cylinder turbo-petrol engine producing 105kW/250Nm, but it doesn’t power the car directly – instead, it works as a generator to fill up a battery bank, and the car drives in ‘EV’ mode all the time. Even so, it still uses a surprising amount of fuel to do that, with the ‘hybrid’ option claiming 6.1L/100km.

    It has a practical cabin space, nice materials, quality technology and a democratic approach to safety tech, too. There’s a lot to like here, but the prices are a touch higher than most rivals, and the servicing costs can be far more expensive than you’d think for a Nissan.

    The brand offers a five-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, with capped-price servicing for six years, but with intervals every 12 months/10,000km meaning you’ll be seeing your Nissan workshop more often.

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    4 Door Wagon
    55 L > 705 to 902 km
    4x4/4WD/FWD/AWD
    1650 - 2000 kg Towing Capacity

    New design and refinement is most welcome

    More expensive than some rivals

    Pros: New design and refinement, great tech and safety, three-row options available

    Cons: More expensive than most rivals, servicing intervals are short and pricey

    Boot space: 465L with the third-row down for seven-seat models, up to 585L for five-seat versions

    The Nissan X-Trail arrived late to the party, but it was fashionably late. Having launched in other markets years before we got it, the new-generation model still offers a great choice for buyers in the market for a medium SUV with five or seven seats, and it also has an interesting array of powertrain options.

    The entry-level models are powered by a 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine with 135kW/234Nm, and it’s available with front- or all-wheel drive, depending on the grade. It uses a CVT automatic transmission, and fuel use is rated at 7.4L to 7.8L/100km.

    However, there’s also the odd-bod e-Power model, which employs a 1.5-litre three-cylinder turbo-petrol engine producing 105kW/250Nm, but it doesn’t power the car directly – instead, it works as a generator to fill up a battery bank, and the car drives in ‘EV’ mode all the time. Even so, it still uses a surprising amount of fuel to do that, with the ‘hybrid’ option claiming 6.1L/100km.

    It has a practical cabin space, nice materials, quality technology and a democratic approach to safety tech, too. There’s a lot to like here, but the prices are a touch higher than most rivals, and the servicing costs can be far more expensive than you’d think for a Nissan.

    The brand offers a five-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, with capped-price servicing for six years, but with intervals every 12 months/10,000km meaning you’ll be seeing your Nissan workshop more often.

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    Subaru Forester
    8.0
    Subaru Forester
    $37,890 - $50,140

    Pros: Super practical, a very approachable family SUV, all-wheel drive is standard

    Cons: Not as special feeling as some, hybrid isn’t game-changing, old-school interior

    Boot space: 498L

    The Subaru Forester has been a family favourite for Australian buyers for decades, and it continues to be offered with all-wheel drive as standard, which is one of its big selling points.

    The Forester is available with a choice of either a 2.5-litre non-turbo petrol engine (136kW/239Nm) with a CVT auto, while the hybrid version employs a 2.0L four-cylinder producing 100kW/196Nm, but teamed to an electric motor (12kW/66Nm) and lithium-ion battery pack.

    The efficiency of the hybrid isn’t as big a jump as you might hope the $3000 premium would bring, with the petrol-electric models using a claimed 6.7 litres per 100km, while the normal petrol models claim 7.4L/100km.

    No matter the powertrain choice, though, the Forester offers a different feeling cabin to many of its rivals, with a big glasshouse and tall roof making it feel roomy and airy, and there’s genuinely a good amount of back seat space for taller adults, while the boot space is also competitive for the class.

    Subaru offers a five-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, and hybrid models have an eight-year/160,000km warranty cover for the battery pack. There’s a capped-price servicing plan for three or five years, and the maintenance costs are reasonable, but not cheap.

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    4 Door Wagon
    48 to 63 L > 851 to 716 km
    AWD
    1200 - 1800 kg Towing Capacity

    Pros: Super practical, a very approachable family SUV, all-wheel drive is standard

    Cons: Not as special feeling as some, hybrid isn’t game-changing, old-school interior

    Boot space: 498L

    The Subaru Forester has been a family favourite for Australian buyers for decades, and it continues to be offered with all-wheel drive as standard, which is one of its big selling points.

    The Forester is available with a choice of either a 2.5-litre non-turbo petrol engine (136kW/239Nm) with a CVT auto, while the hybrid version employs a 2.0L four-cylinder producing 100kW/196Nm, but teamed to an electric motor (12kW/66Nm) and lithium-ion battery pack.

    The efficiency of the hybrid isn’t as big a jump as you might hope the $3000 premium would bring, with the petrol-electric models using a claimed 6.7 litres per 100km, while the normal petrol models claim 7.4L/100km.

    No matter the powertrain choice, though, the Forester offers a different feeling cabin to many of its rivals, with a big glasshouse and tall roof making it feel roomy and airy, and there’s genuinely a good amount of back seat space for taller adults, while the boot space is also competitive for the class.

    Subaru offers a five-year/unlimited kilometre warranty, and hybrid models have an eight-year/160,000km warranty cover for the battery pack. There’s a capped-price servicing plan for three or five years, and the maintenance costs are reasonable, but not cheap.

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    Mahindra XUV700
    8.1
    Mahindra XUV700
    $36,990 - $39,990

    Pros: Seven seats as standard, better tech than you’d expect, low price, long warranty

    Cons: No ANCAP rating, ownership is a bit unknown, resale question marks

    Boot space: No figure quoted

    This affordable seven-seat SUV is going to be right for those who are ready to roll the dice on a reborn brand in Australia.

    Mahindra - the Indian manufacturer better known for its success selling tractors - is making a splash with models like the new XUV700, a three-row SUV that offers comparable space to the likes of the Outlander and X-Trail, but with a much lower price point and some impressive standard equipment.

    Indeed, both grades - the $36,990 drive-away AX7 and the $39,990 d/a AX7L - come with alloy wheels, LED lighting, twin 10.25-inch displays and a panoramic sunroof.

    There’s plenty of spec, and decent space on the inside, too, with enough room to fit smaller adults in the third row, if needed. Sadly, Mahindra has not supplied cargo capacity figures, but you can fit a couple of small bags behind the third row seats when they’re in use, or if you fold them down you’ll easily fit a pram and luggage.

    The XUV700 is powered by a 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine, with 149kW and 380Nm. It has a six-speed auto transmission and is front-wheel drive. The official fuel consumption figure is on the high side, at 8.3L/100km.

    Mahindra offers a seven-year/150,000km warranty for its models, with seven years roadside assist. There’s four years of capped price servicing offered as well, though note that the first service is due at 12 months/10,000km, while all others stretch out to 15,000km.

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    4 Door Wagon
    60 L > 723 to 723 km
    FWD
    1500 kg Towing Capacity

    Pros: Seven seats as standard, better tech than you’d expect, low price, long warranty

    Cons: No ANCAP rating, ownership is a bit unknown, resale question marks

    Boot space: No figure quoted

    This affordable seven-seat SUV is going to be right for those who are ready to roll the dice on a reborn brand in Australia.

    Mahindra - the Indian manufacturer better known for its success selling tractors - is making a splash with models like the new XUV700, a three-row SUV that offers comparable space to the likes of the Outlander and X-Trail, but with a much lower price point and some impressive standard equipment.

    Indeed, both grades - the $36,990 drive-away AX7 and the $39,990 d/a AX7L - come with alloy wheels, LED lighting, twin 10.25-inch displays and a panoramic sunroof.

    There’s plenty of spec, and decent space on the inside, too, with enough room to fit smaller adults in the third row, if needed. Sadly, Mahindra has not supplied cargo capacity figures, but you can fit a couple of small bags behind the third row seats when they’re in use, or if you fold them down you’ll easily fit a pram and luggage.

    The XUV700 is powered by a 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder engine, with 149kW and 380Nm. It has a six-speed auto transmission and is front-wheel drive. The official fuel consumption figure is on the high side, at 8.3L/100km.

    Mahindra offers a seven-year/150,000km warranty for its models, with seven years roadside assist. There’s four years of capped price servicing offered as well, though note that the first service is due at 12 months/10,000km, while all others stretch out to 15,000km.

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    GWM Tank 300
    8.0
    GWM Tank 300
    $46,990 - $60,990

    Pros: Punchy turbo engine, even punchier hybrid option, proper off-road capability Cons: High fuel use, small boot, low payload capacity Boot space: 400L

    The GWM Tank 300 is, admittedly, a bit of a wildcard on this list, because it really isn’t like any of the other vehicles mentioned here.

    That’s because it has proper off-road underpinnings, including four-wheel drive and diff locks, so it will appeal to those who might plan to venture further than just the campsite when it comes to adventuring.

    There’s a choice of two powertrains on offer - the entry-level model is a 2.0-litre turbo-petrol engine with 162kW and 380Nm, with an eight-speed auto standard with selectable 4x4. The other powertrain also uses a 2.0L turbo four, but teamed to an electric motor capable of 78kW/268Nm, meaning a maximum total system output of 258kW/615Nm, according to GWM. It has a nine-speed auto and torque-on-demand four-wheel drive.

    What’s interesting about this SUV is that it almost feels like a cut-price take on a Mercedes G-Wagen to look at, and to sit in. There is a pair of big, bright digital instrument clusters, a heap of technology and convenience gear, and a fair bit of wow factor in the cockpit, too, no matter whether you choose the Lux entry-level version ($46,990 drive-away for the petrol, $55,990 d/a for the hybrid) or the Ultra top-spec ($50,990 d/a petrol, $60,990 d/a hybrid).

    It offers decent back seat space, but keep in mind that the boot capacity is limited to just 400 litres, and payload capacity is poor, too, from 394kg to 446kg, so don’t go thinking that the claimed 2500kg braked towing capacity is going to mean this thing is ready for the big Aussie trip. But as a runaround, or a single parent’s car, it could be a cool rig.

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    4 Door Wagon
    75 L > 728 to 789 km
    4WD
    2500 kg Towing Capacity

    Pros: Punchy turbo engine, even punchier hybrid option, proper off-road capability Cons: High fuel use, small boot, low payload capacity Boot space: 400L

    The GWM Tank 300 is, admittedly, a bit of a wildcard on this list, because it really isn’t like any of the other vehicles mentioned here.

    That’s because it has proper off-road underpinnings, including four-wheel drive and diff locks, so it will appeal to those who might plan to venture further than just the campsite when it comes to adventuring.

    There’s a choice of two powertrains on offer - the entry-level model is a 2.0-litre turbo-petrol engine with 162kW and 380Nm, with an eight-speed auto standard with selectable 4x4. The other powertrain also uses a 2.0L turbo four, but teamed to an electric motor capable of 78kW/268Nm, meaning a maximum total system output of 258kW/615Nm, according to GWM. It has a nine-speed auto and torque-on-demand four-wheel drive.

    What’s interesting about this SUV is that it almost feels like a cut-price take on a Mercedes G-Wagen to look at, and to sit in. There is a pair of big, bright digital instrument clusters, a heap of technology and convenience gear, and a fair bit of wow factor in the cockpit, too, no matter whether you choose the Lux entry-level version ($46,990 drive-away for the petrol, $55,990 d/a for the hybrid) or the Ultra top-spec ($50,990 d/a petrol, $60,990 d/a hybrid).

    It offers decent back seat space, but keep in mind that the boot capacity is limited to just 400 litres, and payload capacity is poor, too, from 394kg to 446kg, so don’t go thinking that the claimed 2500kg braked towing capacity is going to mean this thing is ready for the big Aussie trip. But as a runaround, or a single parent’s car, it could be a cool rig.

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