Citroen My Ami Buggy concept revealed

Citroen has given the Ami quadricycle a rugged makeover with the My Ami Buggy concept, pitched as an all-electric adventure vehicle.

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Jack Quick
Jack Quick
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It’s more comfortable than a quad bike, smaller than a Suzuki Jimny and has been designed with emissions- and noise-free adventures in mind.

Citroen has revealed its latest concept, the My Ami Buggy, a rugged version of its all-electric Ami city-centric quadricycle.

The French brand suggests this concept would be best used as a recreational vehicle for weekends, or during holidays by the sea or in the countryside.

The automaker takes this further and suggests the My Ami Buggy concept is something “that every child from the age of 14 to 77 would want to add to their Christmas list”.

In France, children as young as 14 are legally allowed to drive light quadricycles, like the Citroen Ami, which are allowed to travel at a maximum speed of 45km/h.

This concept has a two-tone khaki and black exterior, along with ‘Citric Yellow’ highlights and accents.

Setting this My Ami Buggy concept apart from the regular model from the front are the headlight grilles, front nudge bar and altered front bumper.

Up top there’s a panoramic sunroof, roof-mounted LED light bar, spare tyre, roof rails and a sunshade.

The changes to the regular Ami become even more apparent when you look around the side.

What’s immediately apparent are the rugged mud tyres and golden wheels that immediately make the Ami look more rugged and almost quad-bike-like.

This is bolstered by the reworked fender flares that accomodate the larger wheels and tyres.

Citroen has removed the doors on the concept and replaced them with removable transparent canvas that can be used in rainy weather, which it claims is inspired by the Mehari light recreational vehicle.

There are also small, rear-hinged flaps that act as doors, with storage space built into them.

Underneath the My Ami Buggy are rock sliders, there to protect it from demanding terrain.

There are also removable, manually-adjustable side mirrors.

Around the back of the concept are similar grilles on the tail lights to those on the headlights, as well as a redesigned rear bumper.

Inside the concept are new seat cushions with thickness doubled from 35mm to 70mm, as well as the addition of memory foam.

These bright yellow cushions are removable, interchangeable and washable, and Citroen says they’re inspired by a buoy.

Like the regular Ami, there are designated luggage compartments, but Citroen took this a step further by designing a range of luggage specifically designed for these spaces.

The dashboard has storage compartments like the regular Ami, but these have been redesigned for the My Ami Buggy concept and include a gold-finish metal storage rack to prevent objects from moving around.

A singular cup or bottle holder can be found either on the dash or where the bag holder is.

The smartphone clamp has been revamped for the My Ami Buggy concept and features a tube that can be engraved with the owner’s name.

A new conical support has been designed to secure the speaker in the dedicated recess in the dashboard.

All of these accessories have been 3D-printed by Citroen to ensure everything fits snuggly and can be reproduced if needed.

The retractable charging cable for the My Ami Buggy concept is squeezed into the passenger-side rear wheel arch.

Citroen hasn’t supplied the powertrain or battery specifications and outputs, although it’s expected the concept would have very similar outputs to the regular Ami given the strict regulations around quadricycles.

The regular Citroen Ami is powered by a single electric motor that produces 6kW of power and is powered by a 5.5kWh lithium-ion battery pack.

Citroen claims a range of 75km using the WMTC regulations for the regular Ami and the quadricycle has a kerb weight of less than 500kg.

At this stage the Ami isn’t offered locally as Australian Design Rules (ADRs) currently prevent quadricycles from being sold due to safety concerns.

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Jack Quick
Jack Quick

Jack Quick is an emerging automotive journalist based in Melbourne, Australia. Jack recently graduated from Deakin University and has previously competed in dance nationally. In his spare time, Jack likes to listen to hyperpop and play Forza Horizon.

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