Porsche teases LMDh prototype racer ahead of 2023 season

Porsche has teased the rear end of its upcoming Le Mans Daytona hybrid racer with testing commencing in January 2022.

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Jack Quick
Jack Quick
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First previewed in a set of digital renders, Porsche has released a series of teaser images of its upcoming Le Mans Daytona hybrid (LMDh) prototype racer.

All the photos are shot from behind the camouflaged racer and show off the large rear wing and diffuser.

There’s a full-width rear light bar like many Porsche road cars including the 911, Macan, Cayenne and Taycan.

Dual exhaust outlets can be seen on either side of the central fin with a large air-scoop on the roof intended to channel air to cool the hybridised powertrain.

Sponsors of the Porsche prototype racer include Michelin, Mobil, Ansys, TAG Heuer, Multimatic and Boss are seen as decals that run along the side.

There are also a set of Michelin Pilot Sport-branded tyres under the swollen and sculpted wheel arches.

We have yet to see the front of the Porsche LMDh racer apart from a brief glimpse in a render from 2020.

Two new drivers, Dane Cameron and Felipe Nasr, have joined the Porsche Motorsport driver line-up and are both “involved intensively in the further development of Porsche’s LMDh prototypes”.

From the 2023 racing season, Porsche Penske Motorsport will enter the LMDh prototype in both the FIA World Endurance Championship and the North American IMSA WeatherTech SportsCar Championship.

Porsche’s racer will be built on a platform developed by Canadian engineering firm Multimatic.

These LMDh platforms are based on an upgraded LMP2 chassis, of which four are available from four different manufacturers: Dallara, Ligier, ORECA and Multimatic.

Per class regulations, hybrid prototypes have a minimum weight of 1030kg, use a 50kW Bosch hybrid system and Williams Advanced Engineering battery pack, as well as an Xtrac transmission. Total system output is capped at 500kW.

Though the hybrid system is standardised, participating automakers can select the engine it’s mated to and design a body of their choice, provided it meets the regulations.

This hybrid hypercar racing class was jointly conceived by IMSA, FIA and ACO so the prototype racers are allowed to race in both the Rolex 24 at Daytona in the USA, and the iconic 24 Hours of Le Mans using the same body construction.

Porsche has said the hybrid prototype is “scheduled to complete numerous test runs in 2022” ahead of its debut.

“We are working all-out with our partner Penske on the development of the new LMDh prototype and collaborate closely with the chassis manufacturer Multimatic at all times,” said Porsche Motorsport manager Thomas Laudenbach.

“In January, we will begin intensive testing to ensure that we are optimally prepared for our 2023 competition debut.”

Other manufacturers such as Acura, Audi, BMW and Cadillac have confirmed entries for the LMDh class in 2023, with Alpine joining in 2024.

MORE: Porsche returning to Le Mans with LMDh prototype

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Jack Quick
Jack Quick

Jack Quick is an emerging automotive journalist based in Melbourne, Australia. Jack recently graduated from Deakin University and has previously competed in dance nationally. In his spare time, Jack likes to listen to hyperpop and play Forza Horizon.

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