Car Chooser
Car Chooser

2022 Mercedes-AMG EQE 53 EV confirmed for Australia

Mercedes-AMG's new EQE sedan is coming to Australia in top-spec '53' guise, with a 3.5s 0-100km/h time and 500km+ range.

Previous News
Maserati Grecale reveal set for March 22
Maserati Grecale reveal set for March 22
Jack Quick
Jack Quick
Journalist
Published

Mercedes-AMG, the Affalterbach-based performance division of Mercedes-Benz, has officially revealed its worked-over versions of the radical EQE electric sedan.

Unlike its larger AMG EQS sibling, the AMG EQE will be available in two variants – an entry-level AMG EQE 43 4Matic model and a sportier AMG EQE 53 4Matic+ grade.

A Mercedes-Benz Australia spokesperson said only the higher-performance AMG EQE 53 was planned for this market. Information regarding arrival timing and local specification will be available at a later date, they added.

Powering both of these AMG EQE models is a dual-electric motor setup – one on each axle offering fully-variable all-wheel drive.

In the AMG EQE 43 4Matic, the dual-electric motors produce a total system output of 250kW of power and 858Nm of torque. Mercedes-AMG claims this car can do the 0-100km/h sprint in 4.2 seconds and top speed is 210km/h.

The AMG EQE 53 4Matic+ on the other hand produces 460kW and 950Nm and has a claimed 0-100km/h time of just 3.5 seconds. Top speed is 220km/h.

Opting for the AMG Dynamic Plus package in the AMG EQE 53 4Matic+ ups peak power to 505kW and 950Nm for a chest-pumping 3.3-second sprint to 100km/h. The top speed is also increased to 240km/h.

Although the AMG EQE 53 has less power than the AMG EQS 53, its claimed 0-100km/h time is 0.3 seconds faster in regular form and 0.1 faster with the AMG Dynamic Plus package fitted.

This most likely is because the AMG EQE has a kerb weight of 2525kg, which while heavy is around 200kg less than the AMG EQS.

The AMG Dynamic Plus package also gets “Performance” sounds that “creates a unique sound experience with the help of special speakers, bass actuator and a sound generator”.

The high-performance automaker says maximum energy regeneration for the AMG EQE is 260kW and can be adjusted in three different stages. One-pedal driving is the most aggressive of these settings.

Regardless of which model you opt for, the AMG EQE comes with a 90.6kWh capacity lithium-ion battery pack, just like the regular EQE, but has a battery management system that’s tuned specifically for AMG.

Mercedes-AMG claims the AMG EQE 43 is good for up to 533km on the WLTP test cycle, and the AMG EQE 53 has a provisional range of up to 518km – the slight price you pay for that extra jolt of performance.

The AMG EQE will be able to fast-charge at a maximum speed of 170kW. Mercedes-AMG claims that 15 minutes of charging at this speed will add 180km of range.

AC charging is capped at 11kW, unless you opt for the optional 22kW charging speed that adds an alternating current.

In Japan, bi-directional charging will also be possible. It’s unclear if this will be coming to the Australian-spec models at this stage.

Setting the AMG EQE apart from the regular EQE on the design front is its AMG-specific Panamericana ‘grille’ with vertical louvres and high-gloss black front splitter with chrome trim on the air intakes.

Around the side there are high-gloss black AMG side sills, as well as a range of 20- and 21-inch AMG light-weight alloy wheels. These wheels are wrapped in Michelin Pilot Sport EV tyres.

Behind these wheels are AMG high-performance brakes with six-piston calipers and 415mm diameter brake discs on the front axle, with single-piston brake calipers and 378mm discs on the rear axle.

There are also optional AMG ceramic high-performance brakes that swap out the swap the front brake discs for larger 440mm discs. This is only available in conjunction with the 21-inch wheels.

At the back there’s a body-colour rear apron that integrates a diffuser, as well as a larger rear spoiler.

Standard on the AMG EQE is the AMG Ride Control+ suspension system with adaptive damping, which is also standard on the AMG EQS.

This system is able to adjust damping force for each wheel in “a few milliseconds” and is said to “significantly increase the spread between sportiness and comfort”.

Both Mercedes-AMG EQE models are equipped with rear-axle steering as standard, just like the AMG EQS, with steering angle of up to 3.6 degrees.

At speeds below 60km/h, the rear wheels steer in the opposite direction to the front wheels, and at speeds above 60km/h the rear wheels steer in the same direction as the front wheels.

Inside the AMG EQE are AMG seats with Artico synethic leather upholstery, Mircocut microfibre and red contrast stitching. Nappa leather seat upholstery is also available as an option.

The instrument panel and beltline are finished in space grey Artico synthetic leather with Neotex grain and red topstitching.

There’s an AMG Performance flat-bottom steering wheel wrapped in Nappa leather, AMG sports pedals, AMG floor mats and door sill trims with AMG lettering.

Just like the regular EQE, the MBUX Hyperscreen which houses a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster, 17.7-inch central touchscreen, and a 12.3-inch passenger-side touchscreen is optional.

It does include AMG-specific functions and displays though, like the AMG EQS 53.

The navigation system in the infotainment system has “Electric Intelligence” and is able to plan the fastest and most convenient route, including charging stops.

It takes traffic, topography, driving speed, as well as heating and cooling requirements into consideration when a navigation route is planned.

Unlike the EQS with which it shares the Electric Vehicle Architecture, the EQE is a conventional booted sedan. Boot space is the same as regular EQE models at 430L.

Mercedes-AMG adds the EQE’s body is made from 80 per cent recycled steel and after the vehicle’s life, its battery will be repurposed in large-scale energy banks.

MORE: 2022 Mercedes-AMG EQS 53 review, first drive

Share
Link copied!
Jack Quick
Jack Quick

Jack Quick is an emerging automotive journalist based in Melbourne, Australia. Jack recently graduated from Deakin University and has previously competed in dance nationally. In his spare time, Jack likes to listen to hyperpop and play Forza Horizon.

Learn about CarExpert or contact CarExpert.

Also on CarExpert