2021 Mercedes-Benz EQA in Australia mid-year

Mercedes-Benz has released its smallest EQ model yet. The new EQA 250 will be touching down locally in the middle of this year.

2 months ago
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Scott Collie
News Editor

Mercedes-Benz has revealed the second SUV in its burgeoning EQ electric range, the 2021 EQA.

Based on the same underpinnings as the GLA SUV and the A-Class hatchback, the EQA 250 will be available in Australia during the middle of 2021.

It’ll go head-to-head with the Tesla Model 3 and Hyundai Kona Electric when it arrives, given the European starting price is equivalent to around $75,000 in Australia.

Power in the EQA 250 comes from a front-mounted electric motor making 140kW of power and 375Nm of torque, and has a claimed range of 426km on the tougher WLTP drive test.

The 100km/h sprint takes 8.9 seconds, and flat out you’ll be doing 160km/h. That puts the EQA alongside the base GLA200 for performance.

With 120kW of power and 250Nm of torque from its 1.3-litre four-cylinder engine, the entry-level petrol SUV hits 100km/h in 8.6 seconds.

Charging the liquid-cooled 66.5kWh (usable) battery at home using a wall box will take 5 hours 45 minutes, while a fast charge using DC public infrastructure will take just 30 minutes to 80 per cent. Peak charge speed is 100kW.

Mercedes-Benz says more powerful, dual-motor EQA variants are in the works with more than 200kW and a range beyond 500km.

Like in the larger EQC, the sound deadening in the EQA has been redone to deal with the fact there’s no internal-combustion engine noise to drown out road roar and wind whistle.

The electric motors and front/rear subframes are mounted using rubber bushings designed specifically for EQ electric vehicles, while the air-conditioning compressor has been reworked to operate more quietly given it lacks the cover of a noisy petrol engine.

Inside, the EQA closely follows the blueprint laid down by the GLA, and the A-Class before it.

Although the MBUX infotainment system is available with two 7.0-inch displays in Europe, it’s likely to be exclusively offered with the higher-spec 10.25-inch screens Down Under.

A range of different interior finishes will be offered, from the eco-focused Electric Art trim to a sportier AMG Line option, but all have the same high-tech screen layout and ambient lighting system.

Boot space is 340L, down 95L on what’s on offer in the petrol-powered GLA200 and GLA250.

The interior trim finishes will be matched on the outside, where buyers will be able to choose between three different finishes. Which will be offered in Australia isn’t yet clear, but the AMG Line package is likely to feature as an option.

With covered grilles and aero-style wheels, the EQA has been designed to slice through the air more efficiently than the petrol-powered GLA.

When it comes to safety, the EQA will be available with a full suite of active safety assistance features, including autonomous emergency braking, lane-keeping assist, blind-spot monitoring, exit warning, junction assist, and adaptive cruise.

The high-voltage electronics automatically cut off in an accident, either reversibly or irreversibly depending on how hard the hit was, and the car will immediately stop charging if it’s crashed into while plugged in.

Under the skin, the EQA rides on a steel passive suspension setup as standard. Adaptive dampers are optional.

The EQA is part of an electric rollout that will soon also include an EQB, and already includes the EQC SUV.

Not only did Mercedes-Benz last year confirm its long-rumoured EQE sedan, it also teased a prototype of an EQS SUV and announced an EQE SUV will also join the range.

EQE and EQS-badged models will use a new, dedicated electric vehicle architecture called, quite simply, Electric Vehicle Architecture.

MORE: Mercedes-Benz EQA news, reviews, comparisons and videos
MORE: Everything Mercedes-Benz


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