Which brands are going fully electric and by when?

More and more automotive brands are pledging to switch an all-electric range. Keep up-to-date with the latest plans with this handy guide.

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Derek Fung
Derek Fung
Journalist
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Since the beginning of 2021, barely a month has gone by without an automotive brand announcing it will ditch internal-combustion engines (ICE) in favour of electric motivation.

With plans evolving at a breakneck pace, it can be hard to keep track of when brands will be cutting off their petrol and diesel umbilical cords, so we’ve gathered all dates together in one easy-to-follow place.

BrandDateCaveats
Tesla2005
Smart2019
Polestar2021When Polestar 1 production ends
Abarth2024More
DS2024More
Lancia2024More
Alpine2025When current A110 production endsMore
Jaguar2025More
Alfa Romeo2027More
Opel/Vauxhall2028Europe onlyMore
Lotus2030When Emira production endsMore
Volvo2030More
Mini2030More
Aston Martin2030ICE available in track carsMore
Bentley2030More
Cadillac2030More
Fiat2030Unclear, but likely Europe onlyMore
Ford (Europe)2030Passenger cars only, commercial vehicle sales will be 66% electrifiedMore
Mercedes-Benz2030“Where market conditions allow”More
Audi2033Except ChinaMore
Buick
Chevrolet
GMC
2035GM’s plan “aspires to eliminate tailpipe emissions from new light-duty vehicles by 2035”More
Honda
Acura
2040Will also sell hydrogen fuel cell vehiclesMore

As you can see in the table above, European brands are leading the charge to go fully electric. This is driven both by a general consensus about climate change, and tightening regulations in the EU.

With diesel going out of fashion and the EU fining automakers which step over the 95g/km of CO2 limit for their new car fleet, brands have recently rushed to embrace hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and electric drivetrains.

In July, the European Commission proposed to cut the CO2 limit to zero by 2035, effectively banning the sale of new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars.

Most of the brands going electric-only before 2030 are smaller players, such as Smart, DS, and Alpine, with little to lose and plenty to gain by getting a head start on the competition.

Mainstream brands which have committed to going all electric by around 2030 are often doing so with caveats.

Ford and Opel/Vauxhall, for instance, will only have electric ranges in Europe, while Audi and Mercedes-Benz will sell cars with internal-combustion engines in China or where market conditions aren’t favourable.

With sales of around 660,000 cars last year, Volvo is the highest-volume brand promising to switch to an all-electric range across the globe by 2030.

General Motors’ plan to ditch petrol and diesel by 2035 in “light-duty vehicles” is purely aspirational, while Honda won’t be internal-combustion-free for another 19 years.

The manufacturers without a publicly-stated electric-only goal are planning to massively expand their EV offerings, many based on dedicated electric architectures.

As you can see in the table below, most of these automakers have also provided guidance as to their expected EV/ICE sales split in the coming years.

AutomakerBrandsGoals
BMW GroupBMW
Mini
Rolls-Royce
By 2030: 50 per cent of salesMore
FerrariFerrari(No stated goal, first EV coming 2025)More
FordFord
Lincoln
By 2030: 40 per cent of global salesMore
GeelyGeely
Lynk & Co
Proton
(No publicly stated goal)
HyundaiHyundai
Kia
Genesis
Hyundai by 2025: 560,000 annual sales
Kia by 2029: 25 per cent of global sales
More
IsuzuIsuzu(No publicly stated goal)
MazdaMazdaBy 2030: 25 per cent of salesMore
MitsubishiMitsubishi(No publicly stated goal)
NissanNissan
Infiniti
By 2030: 40 per cent of US sales
RenaultRenault
Dacia
Lada
By 2030: 90 per cent of European sales
SAICMG
LDV
(No publicly stated goal)
Tata MotorsTata
Land Rover
Land Rover By 2030: 60 per cent of salesMore
SsangYongSsangYong(No publicly stated goal)
StellantisPeugeot
Citroen
Chrysler
Dodge
Ram
Jeep
By 2030: 70 per cent PHEV and EV in Europe
By 2030: 40 per cent PHEV and EV in the US
More
SubaruSubaruBy 2030: 40 per cent PHEV, EV and hybrid
SuzukiSuzuki(No publicly stated goal, first EV in 2025)
ToyotaToyota
Daihatsu
Lexus
(No publicly stated goal)
Volkswagen GroupVolkswagen
Skoda
Seat
Cupra
Porsche
Lamborghini
By 2030: 50 per cent of sales
By 2040: Nearly 100 per cent of sales in “major markets”
More

With the even US setting a 50 per cent electrified vehicle sales target for 2030, it’s clear automakers will continue ploughing more of the research and development dollars in EVs.

We will update this article as brands and automakers announce new targets or plans to go fully electric.

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Derek Fung
Derek Fung
Derek Fung is a Journalist at CarExpert.
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